Curious About Off-Grid Living

Off Grid Living Bible Book Cover

The book by, Bradley Stone, covers the basics of some important considerations when deciding to venture into off-grid living. The levels, types, or progressions of off-grid living are presented, from the most complete, roughing it, to the least, staying somewhat connected on some level to the grid. Showing that there is some place off-grid for everyone.


The basic aspects of deciding how far off the grid you want to be and where is the best place to be for the new life you want is the basic premise for the work. Which states rank best for different aspects of off-grid living, from types of building restrictions, such as what size of residences are required, to different water access rights, can you use the water on your land, are listed in Top 10 lists. Did you even know that there are certain locations across the US that actually legally demand how large your residence has to be? Or that most locations have some form of restrictions and or limitations on rain water catchment on private property? As well as some states, such as Florida, have newer laws in place that require that ALL residences be connected to the grid. 

Photo by cottonbro on Pexels.com

One of the short-falls in the book is that while the author details what he considers the pros and cons of different renewable energy sources, he does not truly explain the cons of ALL trending renewable energy sources. The idea of living in balance with nature is touted in the chapters on water and energy, yet the author is completely silent on the environmental damage to procure the resources to make solar panels and windmills, nor does he discuss their life expectancy or the fact that they are not recyclable, so what becomes of them when they no longer function? 

If you are truly interested in how in out of balance our current renewable energy sector is check out our article reviewing Bright Green Lies.

That being said, this book while not a true Bible, in the sense of being comprehensive and in-depth, is a good starting point for someone interested in knowing more about the whats, hows, and wheres of off-grid living. After reading this book, truly interested readers should absolutely do much more research including seeking out homesteading and prepping groups and forums, even to just to lurk in them and see what those in the know are actually doing, experiencing, and how they are getting on. One suggestion from the author that I think is a really good one, especially if you have no experience of “roughing it” at all, is to seek out places where you can AirBnB or lodge or rent different levels of off-grid holidays for at least a week. It’s really easy to make sure that you take care of all the things you might miss over a weekend; additionally, most people can have a ‘new and different’ life for a weekend and ‘do fine’. But going without internet, or indoor plumbing or electricity, or having to harvest your whole meal, before each meal can get really old really fast. So spending at least a week, will give you a more balanced idea of just how rough you like it. 

*Book Cover ScreenShot via BookSirens.

** Copy Received for honest review.

*** Featured Image: Chickens In The Yard by Dejan Arnautović

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